Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)


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Du kanske gillar. Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey Sheila Murnaghan. The Poetry of Homer S. The Philosopher's Song Kevin M. Homeric Megathemes D.

Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey : Sheila Murnaghan :

Greek Heroes in and out of Hades Stamatia G. Diachronic Dialogues Ahuvia Kahane. Immortal Armor Derek Collins. Becoming Achilles Richard Holway. Visa fler. Bloggat om boken. Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey Sheila Murnaghan kr. Bassett kr. Crotty kr.

PsycCRITIQUES Review–Critiqued

Maronitis kr. Smethurst kr.

Holway offers a reworking of the understanding of Achilles as a hero based on a revised reading. He uses ideas first proposed by Freud and Bowlby. His concern in this study is the emotional abuse of children by their caregivers. The hero of the Iliad has unconsciously redirected early emotional trauma. It is redirected into hero-seeking behavior. It is internal, repressed narcissistic rage that has deadly behavioral consequences.

Holway takes the childhood story of Achilles and builds a case against heroic psychology. At bottom, he argues that the epic poem is about denial: individual and collective denial of abusive and traumatic features of a mother—son relationship. Through a cathartic story we get a purging of original anger at devaluating parents. Family psychology, father—son psychology, and mother—son psychology all become greater than the sum of their parts to produce a culture of the heroic.

Complex dynamics are framed into well-worn oedipal or simplistic attachment theories. Our hero Achilles is subject to what might be called a clinical analysis of defenses. Both mother Themis [ sic ] and son Achilles have to uphold the false image of self as superior.

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Achilles is also, and this is the deadly aspect of it all, a hero—son who serves maternal revenge: pretty typical dysfunctional family dynamics, if you ask me. Although he delivers a promistted Freudian analysis, albeit not contemporary Freudian, it is misleading to think that attachment theory is here used to enhance our understanding of the plight of Achilles. Although Holway claims attachment trauma, he does not really specify it.

These conceptual readings feel retro and thin. Last, my bias as a clinician interested in how people change has me wondering why Holway does not address the ways Achilles moves from untamed aggression and the need for absolute uniqueness to a capacity to acknowledge the existence of the other. We know that the Iliad left a decisive mark on Greek tragedy via its profound humanity, which experiences suffering as suffering and death as death, even if they strike the enemy Kaufmann, This humanity is at the very center of the Greek contribution to civilization.

It is its main achievement. Warriors on all sides have mothers and fathers, and many have wives and children.

Achilles and Priam mourn together over the loss that defines us as human. Afterward, they eat together and sleep in the same hut. True, this transformation may have developed against a background of violence and death. We are involved with Achilles, I believe, because we identify with his change from narcissism to relatedness. Your email address will not be published.


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Extract regarding daughters who become mothers of heroes Review in Choice. Reviewed by Spyros D. References Eco, U. Confessions of a young novelist. Tragedy and philosophy. Orfanos, S. Voyaging the relational sea change [Foreword]. Harris Eds. Evolution of process pp. New York, NY: Routledge.

A Long and Difficult Journey, or The Odyssey: Crash Course Literature 201

Shedler, J. The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist , 65 , 98— A bad reminder from a 3,year-old fictional character. It is helpful to distinguish subject matter bad stuff, admittedly from import. Knowledge of how harmful things work—at the level of the individual and, in this case, of culture—can illuminate and liberate. Did they also teach that this common, culturally useful but psychologically and even politically destructive fear—based on the equation of mere mortality with nonentity—was the result of culturally distinctive forms of sacrificial parenting, for which the Iliad and its myths scapegoat Agamemnon, as a child-sacrificing father and people-devouring king?

It is misleading to think that attachment theory is here used to enhance our understanding of the plight of Achilles. I highlight incredibly precise correspondences between key aspects current attachment theory and research and the Iliad and its myths. I do this with the advice and assistance of current attachment researchers whom I cite in the notes and thank in the acknowledgments.

Perhaps what we have here is a difference of opinion about what features of attachment theory are most illuminating for the Iliad. Instead of a loving and beloved child, he experiences himself as worthless, hateful. It also betrays trust, compounding trauma. That said, there is something retro about my book.

Wine and Wine Drinking in the Homeric World

For Achilles meaning comes by way of recognition from others for his godlike qualities. Does it matter whether the godlike qualities for which he desperately wants recognition are components of a false self-construct of invincibility based on disavowing his human qualities—defined from an attachment perspective? True , this transformation may have developed against a background of violence and death. Here we need to distinguish ignoring from challenging. For it is precisely the shame of spurned care-seeking—which, in the heroic culture of the Iliad , is associated with with frighteningly weak and shameful mortality—that heroic striving is meant to surmount.

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Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)
Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches)

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