Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)


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To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Mountain Home , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Sep 18, Adam Light rated it it was amazing. Very impressed with this novella. I can't recommend it enough. This is an author to be reckoned with. Great book! View all 3 comments. Mountain Home is Bracken MacLoed's debut novel, but you'd never know it.

Bracken has created an intricate story with great characters and interesting plot lines that will keep you turning the page. The suspense starts at the very beginning and Bracken manages to sustain the tense emotion throughout the entire book. Mountain Home covers the plight of a group of characters that are put to the test when a local diner is caught under sniper fire. Some of the characters are out for themselves, whereas Mountain Home is Bracken MacLoed's debut novel, but you'd never know it. Some of the characters are out for themselves, whereas others feel the need to help everyone survive.

Each individual learns more about themselves and the others when the pressure is on. Not only do the patrons of the diner have to contend with being under fire by an unknown sniper, there's also something sinister lurking around in the forest. Bracken has knocked it out of the park with his first novel and I eagerly await his next one. One of the things I most admire about MacLeod's writing is his ability to make the characters so engaging. We immediately bond with them and that makes the tale even more harrowing. It's not just that we have shared experiences, it is their humanity.

Our hero in White Knight makes some really questionable choices but we realize that they are the same choices we would make if we were in his shoes. He is a slightly dirty White Knight and that makes him real. No one does the right thing all of the One of the things I most admire about MacLeod's writing is his ability to make the characters so engaging. No one does the right thing all of the time and the best heroes are the ones we can believe could be real, the heroes who might be us. This man has two goals; to rescue a woman and to keep a child safe and he understands that he needs to break some rules to get that done.

Because we are so invested in his character we easily allow him to do unsavory things and still hold our interest, our loyalty and our admiration. The ending has a fine moral twist that I felt pretty good about, although if questioned in a court of law I will have to deny knowledge of. It's a one sitting book. Make sure you have the time to give because it is fairly impossible to put down once you turn to page one. It moves at a mind numbing pace that sometimes leaves you breathless. It will also make you question what you believe is true and wonder about the definition of victim and perpetrator.

View 1 comment. In the first book I read by this author, Come To Dust , what I loved most was the plot and the state of the world that he wrote about. In this book, I loved the characters the most. The two main characters, Lyn the protagonist and Joanie the antagonist, are both very well developed: you feel Joanie's pain and understand her motives, while you root for 4. The two main characters, Lyn the protagonist and Joanie the antagonist, are both very well developed: you feel Joanie's pain and understand her motives, while you root for Lyn despite her not fitting the archetype of a hero and not always acting like a hero should.

Some of the secondary characters were not as well developed, such as the secondary antagonist Beau who was almost cartoonish in his cowardice, racism, and sexism, but he was still believable in the story. The book is very action-packed and tense for the duration, which made it a very enjoyable read. There were a couple times when I was slightly confused about the timeline, but it was nothing major, and I think if I went back and reread, I'd put the pieces together a bit better than upon my first read.

I also wish there had been a bit more detailed about Kreewatan. For the first half of the book, I had planned to give it 4 stars, but upon staying up way too late to finish it, I realized it's good enough for 4. The author's note at the end was super interesting and I love the discussion of what things to cut vs the things the author really felt were important to include in this "restoration" edition. I agree with the author in that the two big changes for this edition that were originally included before it was published definitely made the book better.

I look forward to reading his other works! View all 4 comments. Sep 24, Kit Power rated it it was amazing. Mountain Home is a superb hard core thriller. Mr Macleod has a real gift for character and setting - the people in this story feel painfully real. Likewise, the mill they are put through, while extreme, has the awful ring of authenticity to it. The book evokes Stephen King's The Mist, Rambo, and the action movie genre in general, but has far deeper, realer and richer characterisation than that genre usually musters. This is not thrills for thrills sake, but rather an intense exploration of peopl Mountain Home is a superb hard core thriller.

This is not thrills for thrills sake, but rather an intense exploration of people under enormous pressure, facing slim odds. It's a story of blood, survival, and the costs of violence. Intelligent and thoughful, without ever veering into pretension, with a crisp, clean prose style, I am mightily impressed with this book, and look forward to more work from this clearly talented author.

Sometimes things pile up around you and the stink and the pain of it is too much to bear. It smothers you with helplessness and frustration and the only thing you can do is to start kicking. Some of us have a great deal to lose and some of us have s Sometimes things pile up around you and the stink and the pain of it is too much to bear. Some of us have a great deal to lose and some of us have so little that the one little thing we have, a view of the mountains from our front porch, becomes so huge we will slaughter anyone who threatens to take it away.

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MacLeod never writes women as helpless or needy. His women will knock you down and shred your skin on the way to the floor. They are ferocious and heroic but most of all we love them for their ability to show us kindness and love when deserved. Joanie is a warrior with battle scars that are deep and still bleeding. Lyn is an artist with family scars that are equally painful. They respect each other and they understand. Some things do not deserve forgiveness; the rape of a woman, the betrayal of a family, the torture of the vulnerable, the cowardice of someone who could have helped and turned their back instead.

These things require accountability.

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In the process, sometimes the innocent suffer. Sometimes it hurts. It will make you take stock of your own values. Placed in a situation where you were called to reach into your deepest resources, could you do it…would you? Joanie Myer is a retired veteran who served her country in Afghanistan and Iraq. She's a master sniper and just wants to live the rest of her life in peace at her isolated Idaho home.

But someone else doesn't want her there and builds a diner right across the street in an attempt to drive her away. But unfortunately for him, Joanie doesn't budge. MacLeod slowly reveals what makes Joanie Joanie Myer is a retired veteran who served her country in Afghanistan and Iraq. MacLeod slowly reveals what makes Joanie tick, and the suspense level is nearly non-stop. Among the people Joanie has trapped, waitress Lyn goes from quiet worker to taking over the situation while somehow managing to help others in the process. We like her from the moment we meet her and cheer her on every second afterwards.

MacLeod's debut novel is a quick, well-crafted tale that reads as if it were written by a seasoned vet full pun intended. Joanie Myer would surely give John Rambo much to worry about. Great stuff here. Jun 21, J. Let me tell you why I hate Bracken MacLeod. With every sentence, MacLeod stabs you in your heart, showing you what true talent looks like.

If you are a budding writer, stay away! Disheartenment lies in these pages.


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Through his subtle command of wit, his characters can be funny in the most tragic ways. The metaphors flow seamlessly providing the reader a multi-layered understanding that just leaps off the page. The story explodes with complexity, but retains that thread to bring it all together to Let me tell you why I hate Bracken MacLeod. The story explodes with complexity, but retains that thread to bring it all together to a satisfying end. Simply, he makes it look easy. To read White Knight or Mountain Home is to see how stories are meant to be written. While I may thank Bracken MacLeod for writing such a marvelous work, I must also shake my fist in the air while I burn my own to start again from the beginning, wishing my words could stand next to his.

Damn you, sir. Damn you straight to hell. But not before you write another book. Get to work! Mountain Home gives you equal parts thrill ride and poetic horror. MacLeod excels at creating a story rich with a number of versatile characters that make the story happen; their stories don't happen to them.

Characters that feel real in every sense, with interactions and dialogue that is some of the strongest I've read in the genre. Bracken MacLeod blew me away with sickeningly intense action,characters that make you feel I relish a book that can give me a sto Mountain Home gives you equal parts thrill ride and poetic horror. I relish a book that can give me a story with this sort of urgency, and doesn't sacrifice the human element to force excitement.

Mountain Home is a must read, and one I plan to pick up again. Solid dark fantasy with a brutal opening and haunting finale. Joanie is ex-military. She's purchased a home with a view up in the mountains. Trying to move on with her life after a tragic experience during her time overseas, she runs into more trouble with a local.

This is the final straw. Life's kicked her ass, now she's ready to strike back. What this book needed was more Joanie. All the scenes and bits with her past and present were compelling. I would have liked it better if the entire book was written from her POV. I just couldn't get into the diner characters. I found myself wanting the story to move along and get back to Joanie. Unfortunately, the majority of the book is the diner and its cast and how they are dealing with being under fire.

Bracken MacLeod does dark fantasy?! Who knew? I sure didn't. Regardless, Mouse and Owl is a fine novelette featuring the sort of powerful, thoughtful writing I've come to expect from Bracken's work. A savage opening in which we bear witness to a brutal execution paves the way for this short but satisfying tale of revenge and magic. Nov 19, Sydney rated it it was amazing Shelves: books-i-have-reviewed.

I could have sworn I posted this already, but it looks like it disappeared It penetrates the innocent and the guilty with equal intent and creates victims with the same enthusiasm with which it saves them from the bullets of others. No feelings of I could have sworn I posted this already, but it looks like it disappeared No feelings of regret or elation occur to it as it tears skin, breaks bone, rips through organs, and frees blood to flow over them all. A bullet is the ultimate punctuation: more final than a period, more forceful than an exclamation, and never a question.

A bullet is only potential and, after fired, it settles into eternity as a dead heap with no future. It is a powerful, tense, and extremely real story delivered in prose that makes the writing disappear and the events unfold before the reader more like a film than a book. The supernatural element is one I found to be both intriguing and somewhat elusive, though not underdeveloped.

It dwells on the outskirts of the novel, mirroring its involvement in the plot. The violence is extreme, graphic, and cruel—MacLeod immediately shocks us with it in the Prologue—but the sensitivity with which he develops his characters and the message his story sends makes the stark, explosive violence all the more compelling.

And while the circumstances which led to her actions are not nearly as enjoyable as the end result, they certainly lend credibility to her brutal rampage. For MacLeod to elicit sympathy from the reader for a character who acts with such cold, calculated precision is no small feat—but he does it.

All the while, he is simultaneously weaving a tumultuous plot with the other characters, including our protagonist, Lyn—a dynamic and unfailingly human young woman who in many ways is doing what Joanie is doing—taking a stand. The writing borders on the fringes of genres much like the creature lingers on the periphery of the woods—and the plot. MacLeod nailed this, and will have a huge audience already in place for his next literary venture. Mountain Home. The words elicit wonderful images of a quiet vista. Macleod E Revolution.

Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Volume 1: Morals, Politics, Art, Religion. A History of Scottish Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. Thomas Paine and Jeffersonian America. Paine and Jefferson in the Age of Revolution. Jeffersonian America. British Spectators of the French Revolution: the view from across the Channel. Groniek , , pp. Conservative reaction, c. Macleod E Conservative reaction, c. In: Macleod E ed. British Visions of America, Republican Realities. The Enlightenment World, London: Pickering and Chatto, pp.

Enlightenment World, London: Pickering and Chatto. English Historical Review , , pp. Baptist Quarterly , 44 4 , pp. Gender, War and Politics: Transatlantic Perspectives, War, Culture and Society, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. By Bob Harris. London: Pickering and Chatto, ISBN: Scottish Historical Review , 89 2 , pp. Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies , 33 1 , pp. Trials for Treason and Sedition, Book Review. Review of: Trials for Treason and Sedition, Edited by John Barrell and Jon Mee.

Part 1: ISBN: X. Part 2: Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies , 32 2 , pp. British Attitudes to the French Revolution. Historical Journal , 50 3 , pp. By Matthew McCormack. Manchester University Press. History , 92 , pp. Scottish Responses to the Irish Rebellion of Edinburgh: Birlinn Imprint: John Donald , pp. In: Harris B ed. Scotland in the Age of the French Revolution. Edinburgh: John Donald, pp. Annales Historiques de la Revolution Francaise , , pp. Pitt the younger: A life Book Review. ISBN By Ian Donnachie.

Dalswinton Steam Boat, 1788-1988

East Linton: Tuckwell Press. ISBN 1 0. Scottish Historical Review , 82 , pp. A unique and glorious mission: Women and presbyterianism Scotland, Book Review. Orr Macdonald, Edinburgh: John Donald, , pp. Victorian Studies , 45 4 , pp. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. History , 88 , pp. Scotland in the eighteenth century: Union and Enlightenment Book Review. By David Allan. Harlow: Longman. History , 87 , pp. The Crisis of the French Revolution. In: Dickinson H T ed. A Companion to Eighteenth-Century Britain. Blackwell Companions to British History.

Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. Review of: Peter Clark ed. Scottish Historical Review , 81 , pp. Revolutionary Britannia? Reflections on the threat of Revolution in Britain, Book Review. Macleod E Revolutionary Britannia? Review of: Revolutionary Brittania? The Younger Pitt Book Review. Imagining the king's death: Figurative treason, fantasies of regicide Book Review.


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Macleod E Imagining the king's death: Figurative treason, fantasies of regicide Book Review.

Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book) Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)
Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book) Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)
Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book) Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)
Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book) Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)
Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book) Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)
Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book) Back on Track: Diary of a Street Kid (A Mark Macleod book)

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