My Radiotherapy Blog


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online My Radiotherapy Blog file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with My Radiotherapy Blog book. Happy reading My Radiotherapy Blog Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF My Radiotherapy Blog at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF My Radiotherapy Blog Pocket Guide.


Following Patients for More than a Decade

Shop before your treatments so there is food at home. Choose meals that are easy to prepare or make meals you can freeze for later.

Making Your Mask for Proton Therapy

It can also reduce the side effects of treatment. If you smoke, try to stop. Many hospitals provide help or advice on how to quit smoking. Ask your clinical oncologist, radiographer, or specialist nurse if your hospital provides this service. If you are working or you are a student, it is a good idea to talk to your employer or tutors. They can make arrangements to support you and organise your time off during treatment.

Helen talks about her experience of working through cancer and how she asked her boss to make adjustments. Back to Radiotherapy explained. Radiotherapy uses high-energy rays to destroy cancer cells. This treatment is used to cure some types of cancer or to relieve symptoms. Radiotherapy can cause side effects. Your radiographer or nurse will give you advice or medicines to help manage them. During most types of radiotherapy to the brain, head or neck, you wear a mask to help you keep still. You will meet many different specialists from your radiotherapy team. You may see them before, during and after radiotherapy treatment.

Preparing questions to ask your health professionals can help you understand your treatment better. Order booklets or audio CDs about radiotherapy, how it works, having treatment and how it might affect you. All types of treatment can have different side effects. Know what to expect to help you find the best way for you to handle them.

Coping with symptoms and side effects. If you're deciding which charity to support with your fundraising, talk to us. We want to be there for everyone affected by cancer, and we need your help. Why choose us. What's happening near you? Find out about support groups, where to get information and how to get involved with Macmillan where you are. In your area. Read Lynne's post about working in radiotherapy. She talks about the benefits of visiting the department before treatment, following dietary advice and listening to healthcare professionals. A group for discussions and questions about radiotherapy.

Get together, share your experiences and support each other. Thanks We rely on a number of sources to gather evidence for our information. We thank all those people who have provided expert review for the information on this page. Our information is also reviewed by people affected by cancer to ensure it is as relevant and accessible as possible.

Thank you to all those people who reviewed what you're reading and have helped our information to develop. Need to talk?


  • The Makeup Artist Handbook: Techniques for Film, Television, Photography, and Theatre.
  • The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics (Routledge Philosophy Companions).
  • You are here.
  • Making The News.

Also operating in Northern Ireland. A company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales company number Isle of Man company number F. VAT no: We make every effort to ensure that the information we provide is accurate and up-to-date but it should not be relied upon as a substitute for specialist professional advice tailored to your situation.

So far as is permitted by law, Macmillan does not accept liability in relation to the use of any information contained in this publication or third party information or websites included or referred to in it. Close Find information, articles and activities relevant to you. I've just been diagnosed I'm having treatment I've finished treatment Older people Teens and young adults. Children's cancer Someone I know has cancer I'm looking after someone with cancer Cancer and other conditions Cancer and pregnancy. Home How can we help you today? Create Account.

If you're struggling to find what you need, call our Support line on 7 days a week, 8am-8pm More ways to contact us. Before your radiotherapy. Before you start treatment, you may also need information about: preventing pregnancy.

It may be important not to get pregnant or make someone pregnant during radiotherapy, and for some time afterwards. If you think that you may be pregnant during your treatment, tell your radiotherapy team straight away. Your team will explain if your treatment might affect your ability to start a pregnancy in the future.

They can explain options for preserving your fertility. This may make your treatment more effective and reduce your side effects. Show more Giving consent Research — clinical trails Pregnancy Making someone pregnant If you have a pacemaker, implantable cardiac device ICD or cochlea implant Skin care Other things to think about.

Radiotherapy: I knew what to expect but the reality was quite different | Breast Cancer Care

Giving consent. No medical treatment can be given without your consent. Before you are asked to sign the form you should be given full information about: the type and extent of the treatment its advantages and disadvantages any significant risks or side effects any other treatments that may be available. Back to contents. Research — clinical trails. Before you consent to having radiotherapy, you will need to confirm that you: are not pregnant — you may need to provide a urine sample for a pregnancy test understand you should avoid getting pregnant during treatment — this means you will need to use a reliable form of birth control.

Making someone pregnant. If you have a pacemaker, implantable cardiac device ICD or cochlea implant. Skin care. Other things to think about. Here are some other things to think about before you start your radiotherapy. Getting to your appointments and travel costs You may want to drive yourself to hospital for your treatment. Planning meals and snacks Treatment and travelling to and from hospital can be tiring. Work and study If you are working or you are a student, it is a good idea to talk to your employer or tutors.

Watch: Helen's story Helen talks about her experience of working through cancer and how she asked her boss to make adjustments. Back to Radiotherapy explained What is radiotherapy? Possible side effects of radiotherapy Radiotherapy can cause side effects. Radiotherapy, sex and fertility Radiotherapy may cause changes that affect your sex life or fertility. Masks for radiotherapy During most types of radiotherapy to the brain, head or neck, you wear a mask to help you keep still. Planning your radiotherapy Radiotherapy is carefully planned for each person by a team of experts.

Your radiotherapy team You will meet many different specialists from your radiotherapy team. Finding Health Care Services. Advance Directives. Using Trusted Resources. Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer. Reports, Research, and Literature. Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment. Pediatric Supportive Care. Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment.

Childhood Cancer Genomics. Study Findings. Metastatic Cancer Research. Intramural Research. Extramural Research. Bioinformatics, Big Data, and Cancer. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research. Spotlight on Scientists. Cancer Genomics Research. Research on Causes of Cancer. Cancer Diagnosis Research.

Cancer Prevention Research. Cancer Treatment Research. Cancer Health Disparities. Childhood Cancers Research. Clinical Trials Research. Global Cancer Research. Annual Report to the Nation. Milestones in Cancer Research and Discovery. Stories of Discovery. Terminology Resources. Research Funding Opportunities. Research Program Contacts.

Funding Strategy. Grants Policies and Process. Introduction to Grants Process. NCI Grant Policies. Legal Requirements. Step 3: Peer Review and Funding Outcomes. Grants Management Contacts. Prior Approvals. Annual Reporting and Auditing. Transfer of a Grant. Grant Closeout. Cancer Training at NCI. Resources for Trainees. Funding for Cancer Training. Building a Diverse Workforce. Resources for News Media. Media Contacts.

Radiotherapy for Throat Cancer

Multicultural Media Outreach Program. Cancer Reporting Fellowships. Advisory Board Meetings. Social Media Events. Cancer Currents Blog. Contributing to Cancer Research.

Radiotherapy is hard to deal with, especially after chemo and surgery.

Strategic Planning. Previous NCI Directors. Advisory Boards and Review Groups. NCI Congressional Justification.

My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog
My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog
My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog
My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog
My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog
My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog
My Radiotherapy Blog My Radiotherapy Blog

Related My Radiotherapy Blog



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved