Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community


Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community book. Happy reading Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Pocket Guide.


A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community

Ideas worth spreading. Watch TED Talks. Browse all talks. Active filters:. Sort by:. Newest Relevance Oldest Most viewed. Melvin Sanicas What makes TB the world's most infectious killer? Posted Jun Jonny Sun You are not alone in your loneliness Posted Jun Heidi Grant How to ask for help — and get a "yes" Posted Jun Iseult Gillespie Why should you read "Hamlet"? Ethan Lindenberger Why we need to fight misinformation about vaccines Posted Jun Lindsay Amer Why kids need to learn about gender and sexuality Posted Jun Brandon Clifford The architectural secrets of the world's ancient wonders Posted Jun Augusto Carballido There may be extraterrestrial life in our solar system Posted Jun Lynn Rothschild The living tech we need to support human life on other planets Posted Jun Suleika Jaouad What almost dying taught me about living Posted Jun Graham Baird How do crystals work?

This past Saturday, our DC Capital Pride Parade was suddenly disrupted by what appeared to be a potential active shooter. Persons pushed down barricades, ran in all directions trying to hide and find safety. I recall thinking. What is happening? What should we do now? Most of these reactions will calm down as there is time and distance from the event. Validate your feelings, but also recognize what you are thinking and how these thoughts are influencing the way you feel. But I also know that some stayed away, fearful that something like what happened Saturday night could happen again.

We invite you to come and see if Whitman-Walker is the place for you. We recognize that achieving health and wellness often requires a health care team. James,, p. James, , p. Many insurers require a behavioral health specialist to sign off on gender affirming care before they will pay for services. Our legal team offers free services to help you address legal barriers so you can achieve improved health and wellness. Legal Services can help with name changes, gender discrimination, immigration issues and much more. Join us for this free event to meet staff and learn about how we can help you live healthily and love openly through gender affirming care.

James, S. The Report of the U. Transgender Survey. Whitman-Walker was grateful and pleased to be a part of the coalition supporting this legislation. In time, a third gender marker will also be available in the state of Colorado. In comparison, the former Maryland policy was costly, burdensome, and unnecessary.

Beyond the personal stories we hear, national surveys offer evidence to the need. According to the U.

See a Problem?

Sandy E. James et al. Transgender Survey: Maryland State Report With this step forward in Maryland legislation, our clients will be safer, happier and better affirmed. My budget will ask Democrats and Republicans to make the needed commitment to eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within 10 years. We know that we need more outreach and education to reach people who are living with or at risk of acquiring HIV. As the Administration seems to acknowledge, the tools we need to stop the spread of HIV are ready. However, in order to fully realize the promise of these tools, the Administration will need to dedicate substantial additional funds to the fight.

Ryan White has been essential in this effort, and has accomplished major improvements in viral suppression rates among people with HIV. Public health efforts have come far from puritanical campaigns that taught abstinence or, at the most, condom usage. We can only stop the spread of HIV by working in relationship with the communities we seek to serve. Stay tuned to our website and social media for details to come. Open House for Gender Affirming Services - A Whitman-Walker health and wellness resource fair for transgender, non-binary and gender expansive community members.

East of the River Fall Fest - Our annual back-to-school supplies giveaway and block party in Anacostia! Whitman-Walker 40th Anniversary Gala - An evening of reflecting on our past and looking to our future with the support of our loving communities with a featured performance by BETTY! Register to walk, run or donate at walktoendhiv. Valerie left Central America to come to the United States in search of safety and acceptance. I wish — I wish they had told me they made a giant-ass mistake. Her little body just went [cracking sound]. I wish somebody had been able to tell me those things.

Somewhere in Baltimore, somewhere in Virginia. Crack was: 'Crack addicts, you goddamn bastards. People are on opiates! This is, you know. This will be done in a little while. I mean, I think, I know we still have so much work to do. Randy Pumphrey - a Whitman-Walker employee and former chaplain at St. I did survive, and I do see a different world. You will show us. And I think especially as we think about broadening our reach over in the southeast [Washington, D. A lot of people there know me.

They no longer have that. They just ended it last year. I think that should be re-visited. I love them. They helped save my life, no doubt about it. For instance, we need to see some more black doctors, some more black health care professionals. We need to also hear from the black doctors, the black health care professionals. I mean, you know, I did have a little skepticism initially when they were going in a new direction.

A lot of them are very socially-focused. But I never actually been there. And I was like well you know what? And I was like, Okay well this is my first time there. Like literally everyone spoke to the people behind the counter, to the people sitting in the waiting room. I'm not really worried about anything else. So, then I was just like, oh okay. You know, like I was Googling places, and I was like gay doctor, gay places. So, I was just like making up stuff. I was like, well thats four colors. And he had this wonderful personality. But, no he got a wife, and well today he got a wife and a child.

He was checking on me the whole time. It was such a huge, older crowd that was coming into Max Robinson. Then I met Lynsay, and we just built this conversation there. She took her time. She asked me questions. Like, I just felt real comfortable with her. And I just felt real comfortable. I love her. Then, people could take them out. This was probably early '90s. There was also a health clinic. It was only maybe every month or so, and I know Barbara Lewis was one of the providers there. We had something called Wet, Wild, and Well that we would do.

I think part of it was so much was going towards HIV — necessarily so — but it was kind of easy for lesbian health to just get erased and be kind of invisible. To come to Whitman-Walker was like a dream. It was just on so many levels. Just to be in a queer positive work environment. I applied without a second thought even though I took a pay cut, I think, to go there.

When I first started, the whole division was being reorganized. We still had clients, but they were realizing, I think, the model was not what they wanted it to be. So, they had to grow it. So, the beginning was hard. They were nice. They were nonjudgmental. There was no shame associated with it or anything. It was very well done I thought. So, I actually wanted to start housing programs. You know, senior programs for LGBT seniors.

Nobody was contacting me. So, it was an educational program to different subpopulations. They actually hired a lesbian to run the program. Well, what the hell. Maybe I can get in as a director. So, I applied. So, I just figured well, this is hopeless. Still, I made, I worked 10 hours a week and I made a week. So, I was doing that for a few months right after I finished at Howard and then all of a sudden, I get a phone call out of the blue.

I got hired. He pretty much and his trained volunteers that he worked with worked primarily with the female prostitutes and IV drug users. It was insane. You could get by with milligrams of it and that would contain the virus, prevent it from replicating. It's in the Elizabeth Taylor Building or whatever. I think I'm going to do the same thing because I don't want to stay up here in this medical facility. It was so long ago; it was quite a few years back, but I can't remember. I was very pleased from day one inside.

Then he signed me up with Dr. You're just HIV-positive. There's a big difference in that. He checked my medicine and all. I think he changed some of the medicine that Dr. He had me come back in like two weeks to see how it was working because he had to get my system situated, or whatever. Martins just started working on me and literally from that day — and here it is — I am still living and I am still non-detectible. But thank the Lord, I am still here. I guess it was latish 20s by then.

Twenty-seven or eight or something like that. Jim Graham at the time was the executive director of Whitman-Walker. I remember the interview. I remember the two people who interviewed me. I was hired, I think, on the spot, it seems, and yeah. I had a shared office facing 14 th Street over what is now Doi Moi. And I shared an office with Mike Hildebrandt, who had been there a bit. This is going to be kind of interesting.

I loved Mike. He was wonderful, and he — he got lung cancer a couple years into our relationship working together and it was just really tragic. So, anyway, I jumped right into the job.

You Can't Heal Yourself Out of a Desire!

I remember, you know, maybe there were seven or so case managers at the time. We went through a very important part of our lives together. But it was — I mean, it was grueling. You know, just really, really hard stuff. Walk, run or donate today at walktoendhiv. Former executive director, the late Jim Graham, speaks to the attendees.

Main navigation

The Washington Blade reports on the success of the walk in it's July 3, issue. ETMC was a sanctuary for people who felt ostracized by society at large; a place where people, especially those affected by HIV and those who identified as LGBTQ, were treated with dignity, respect and love. Photo by Lili Leonard. The end redevelopment project, currently under construction and set to be completed in , will create an approximately ,square-foot, mixed-use building that will include an LGBTQ inclusive cultural center and office space for Whitman-Walker, as well as retail and residential space for new tenants.

Healing with the Arts: A Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community by Michael Samuels

Whitman-Walker plans to be around for years to come empowering all persons to live healthy, love openly, and achieve equality and inclusion. Click the orange play button below to hear Amelie's oral history - a recorded interview with an individual having personal knowledge of past events. We want you here. Maybe we did four-hour shifts. So, I would usually do it once a, once a week. And are they still important? So, the board made a decision to sort of reaffirm its commitment to lesbian and gay health issues.

We would actually have a home. Compelled to act, Ellen volunteered as a buddy in Philadelphia and started on a path that led her to Whitman-Walker in Click the orange play button below to hear Ellen's oral history - a recorded interview with an individual having personal knowledge of past events. So, that was like a — as you can imagine, a very life-changing experience. And sometimes I really wish we had been called a task force, because I think that the mission was two-fold.

I sort of helped with that, and also we had educational programs that were taking care of your sexual health. We did a couple of those, but that was one of the things that LSP did. It would house the growing Whitman-Walker Clinic and its clients for more than two decades. Somebodies Hand. A renegade atmosphere pervaded in those days. The bathroom on the first floor was a place of wasting and humiliation. For infection control, the staff used a ratio of one part bleach to 10 parts water. Photo by Ted Eytan. Bill Austin was a DC-based architect living with AIDS who envisioned a place that provided care and compassion for others impacted by the disease.

The Austin Center offered clients a stigma-free space to receive care, play cards, take field trips and spend their days in the company of others. Listen and read long as members of the Whitman-Walker community remember the Austin Center!

Healing with the Arts (embedded videos)

Magrini - a Whitman-Walker employee and former Austin Center volunteer, recalls a special moment with an Austin Center community member:. That was already the presumed situation. I can. I can, I can. It was that kind of interaction. But anyway. Jesus Christ, yes. You know? I was about it, and I was about those boots. I think my hair was freshly cut down. I was looking good. It was seriously all right. Joanne Sincero - a former Austin Center employee, and current Whitman-Walker employee recalls a typical day:.

There was never a day, I think in all my 18 years being there that there wasn't a story. It was really a way to connect with people — around a cup of coffee, around breakfast, around lunch. That time was so, so important. So we would have a plan. You go down and talk to the clients. It was a kind of a trajectory in a certain way. They would go to the carry-out with the IV pole. I remember once going to the Air and Space Museum. We went to the planetarium. You can lay back and look up at the stars. He was a totally resilient survivor. I'm going to the movies.

workshop + course schedule

That was always so hard, especially when you lost a lot of people. So, that was always a challenge. I was looking at this house. We just tried to keep people as engaged and involved as we could. So, there would be arts things, or making jewelry.


  1. Symplasmic Transport in Vascular Plants.
  2. Mint Chocolate Pie (Pie Recipes Book 28).
  3. Cultural Anthropology/Ritual and Religion - Wikibooks, open books for an open world.

People played a lot of Spades. Music was huge, and we had lots of talent shows. We had community meetings, as much as possible, trying to get stuff from clients about what they wanted to do and seeing how we can make that happen. Could you provide us some discounts? I remember one trip we were on, we had gone to a lake and we were swimming. There was a young woman who was a lifeguard. Where are you from? What kind of group?

It was a great little moment. You never know why people are asking things. Sometimes it's just they need support. A typical day kind of changed as the epidemic changed and as new medications became available. Medicine figured out better and better treatments. Some of the people there helping me were gay. A couple were black, not a lot but there were. You have been the reason we exist. You deserve a healthcare home where you can be you and be treated with dignity, respect and love.

Serving you is our privilege. Please meet Tony Burns! Click the orange play button below to hear Tony's oral history - a recorded interview with an individual having personal knowledge of past events. She and I were extremely close. She grew up without her mother and her father. She had it hard. My mother contracted syphilis when she was 13 or 14 years old, and she did not know it.

During that time, where a lot of black gay people were meeting was in the bar. So, I went to my first bar when I was 20 years old. You had in between. There were men dancing with each other. There were men made up to look like women. It was just crazy [chuckles]! And I was at work. And I had a good buddy who worked for the private sector blocks away from me. And he had been to San Francisco, I had not.

That was an awful day. But I went and went into the small room and this guy comes in and he says, 'Mr. Burns, you know why you are here. I said, 'I'm here to get the results from my HIV test. Burns, did you hear me? You've tested positive for HIV. I was helping him clean up. He had had a group. Shortly after that he and a colleague, Meghan Davies, came and found me in the Austin Center one day. So, I said, 'Me? We're not a black, gay guy. You are. We thought maybe it could help. What is he going to say? And so I said to him, 'I know how you feel.

And then I had his attention. I was 31 years old when I was diagnosed. I am excitedly approaching my third year of being a part of the Whitman-Walker Health family. While I learned a lot during my two years with Peer Support, I wanted an opportunity to use my degree in biology. When I come into work , the thing that I most look forward to is being able to see and interact with our study participants. As a gay man, listening to these experiences has brought me closer to my community. It is also to help carry the stories I hear to future generations, so that these narratives live on.

Interested in participating? A native of Baghdad, Ahmed moved to the U. I can remember when he first came on board as a mentee that he was having problems with employment and housing. Is your housing stable? Do you have a job? What about school? Mentoring has given me a gift that I never could foresee coming.

I have been able to fight stigma and confront it in real life, in real time, with my faith, my story. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. What the Supreme Court said. The majority opinion concluded Opinion of the Court, p. Justices Ginsberg and Sotomayor dissented, and held that the gay couple should have won. The majority declared:. Our society has come to the recognition that gay persons and gay couples cannot be treated as social outcasts or as inferior in dignity and worth. What are the implications for future cases?

Moreover, how does the First Amendment apply to goods and services other than wedding cakes? Even more important questions arise outside the marriage context. What about home sales? Adoption and foster care placements? Masterpiece Cakeshop does not support such a radical, expansive view. How the courts will rule remains to be seen. City of Phoenix, filed June 7, Click the orange play button below to hear Joe's oral history - a recorded interview with an individual having personal knowledge of past events.

It was an all-boys camp. So, we decided we needed to report this to the superior. Nothing was done. He was in charge of the, the craft shop which was where the sexual behavior was happening; in the, yeah. So, after the summer, he gets shipped back to the high school that he was teaching math at in Louisville, Kentucky. Everyone knew he was an alcoholic. He eventually — he grew old, stayed in the order, and died in the order. He was in his early 80s when he died.

Very few of them got kicked out. I am just too emotionally dysregulated. Joe has walked in every Walk event. So, one of our members had gone away for a week for a work, a work assignment. He looked fine, right. And, I mean, that was shocking for us. Photo by Moshe Zusman. They were in their late 20s or 30s for the most part. This was a game changer. A native Washingtonian, Strawberry shares his story of being positive in the age of one-pill-a-day HIV treatment. Click the orange play button below to hear Strawberry's oral history - a recorded interview with an individual having personal knowledge of past events.

TV raised me. So, I just did what I seen my aunts and my grandmother and them do. So, you know, they did the cooking, the cleaning. So, TV taught me how to do the basics of what I needed to do. Anyway, they are in jail, so I might as well help the cause. So that was my theory on it. So, I wanted to go to… because I was like I want to have one of my own doctors.

And I was just like, gay doctor and whatever. So, I went there, and when I went there, it was very welcoming. And like the nurse that came out, she came out with such a big smile on her face. And it was there to help them understand that whatever happened, it happened. And you started to build yourself up from there. And everything still worked, arms and legs. Please meet Dr. A Salisbury and Frostburg State alumna, competitive athlete and parent to chickens, horses and a pup named Ruby — Lili has the ability to walk into any room and fill it with her good energy.

Lili earned her doctorate in education in April Click the orange play buttons below to hear parts one and two of D's oral history - a recorded interview with an individual having personal knowledge of past events. But often we just walked. We walked where we were going. We went to a lot of movies. But other times we went to museums.

Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community
Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community
Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community
Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community
Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community
Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community
Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community

Related Healing with the Arts (embedded videos): A 12-Week Program to Heal Yourself and Your Community



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved